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                          Posts with keyword: web


                          The Cloud Is Not the Internet

                          Don't confuse the Cloud with the Internet. They're not the same thing and have different properties.
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                          My Own URL Shortener

                          Nobody likes link rot. Link rot breaks the Web. But in the age of Twitter, short URLs are a necessity. I think the best way to keep my short URLs from rotting is to take charge of the process myself. This post shows how I built a simple, reliable URL shortening service that runs under my control.
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                          Ways Not Places

                          The Web really isn't a Web at all. We've made links second class citizens and consequently built a system where largely stand-along sites site on the "information superhighway" with a few large directories driving people straight to the centralized place of their choice. There is a better way. One that leads to richer outcomes and more interesting futures. Join me there
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                          App Pushers and Enforcers

                          Lately, I've noticed a phenomenon that is extremely unhealthy, not mention annoying: companies more or less forcing you to use their mobile app instead of their Web site. The truth is that most businesses don't need an app. They just need a Web site that works.
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                          Architectures and Patterns: Hitting the Sweet Spot

                          The Web, indeed the Internet, has a rich tradition of being made from "small pieces, loosely joined" to use David Weinberger's excellent phrase. The beauty of the Web is that it's all built from a handful of relatively simple standards: HTML, a standard for marking up documents with formatting instructions and creating rudimentary user interfaces called "forms," HTTP, a simple request-response protocol for moving resource representations (which might be documents formatted in HTML) from place to place, and URIs, a standard for how resources will be universally reference on the Web Using those simple pieces, the Web has evolved
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                          David Weinberger: On Knowing

                          Dave Weinberger is speaking about "knowing." He starts by asking if "the 'Net is exceptional in the same way of the printing press?" There are five things that everyone who goes on the Web knows: There an abundance of stuff--good and bad The 'Net is a permission-free zone There is no principle of organization on the 'Net and if there were, it wouldn't be better, it would be worse Realize that we built this and its ours The 'Net is filled with hyperlinks. These are unexpected results. The hyperlink is important because by connecting things, it lets them fall
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                          The Real-Time Web

                          Over the last several years, we've witnessed a dramatic shift in how people use the Web. What started as interactive Web applications under the moniker "Web 2.0" has become a firestorm of social applications like Facebook, Twitter, and Foursquare, among others. But underlying these changes is something even more important than the "social" Web: the "real-time" Web. The real-time Web is a radical shift in how people use the Internet: rather than simply viewing static pages, or even interacting with a Web site, the real-time Web uses dynamic streams of information to present contextual, relevant experiences to user. These
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                          Persistent Variables in KRL: Threading Sites Together

                          Yesterday I released build 325 of Kynetx Network Services (KNS) which includes a significant addition to the feature set of Kynetx Rule Language (KRL): persistent variables. Persistent variables allow KRL rulesets to store and react to data over multiple visits. This data isn't personally identifying information, but rather the kind of information that makes writing intelligent Web applications easier. Here's an example: an information box placed on a Web site can now have a "don't show this to me again" check box and act accordingly. Persistent variables, or just persistents, will ultimately come in two flavors: Entity variables store
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                          Velocity 08: Jiffy: Instrumenting and Measuring Web Performance

                          Scott Ruthfield from WhitePages.com is announcing a new open-source projects called Jiffy, a tool for measuring the end-to-end performance of Web sites (PDF slides). Jiffy provides real data about performance that is more complete and more fine grained than what you might get from Keynote or Gomez. Jiffy has four goals: Real data at scale - track 100% of page views Measure anything - pre load data access, each add, brand, when the form is ready, and so on Real-time reporting No impact on page performance Jiffy comprises a JavaScript library that instruments the pages, an Apache proxy, a
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                          Web 2.0 and Ecommerce: David Friedman

                          David Friedman of Avenue A | Razorfish is talking about Web 2.0 technogies and ecommerce. The title was "Web 2.0: A reality check" and I was kind of expecting a cautionary tale, but it was more a tale that went something like "if you're not doing this, then you're dead." The Web has always been a great place for surgical shopping. When you know what you want, you can go get it and the experience is largely good. Web 2.0 technologies give us the opportunity to put more of the fun of a traditional shopping experience into the Web.
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                          Wall Street and Web 2.0

                          I really enjoyed this discussion on Web 2.0 and Wall Street from ETech with Bill Janeway and Peter Bloom. There are some interesting parallels and some great discussion from a couple of financial jocks who clearly get technology and, especially, the 'Net. Recommended.
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                          Gin and Television: Using Our Social Surplus

                          Clay Shirky has posted a transcript of his Web 2.0 talk "Gin, Television, and Social Surplus." In it Shirky argues that television was the safety valve that society used to sponge up all the excess cognitive capacity that we developed after World War II. In effect, the mindless activity of watching television kept people from going crazy with all the spare cycles that they had. Shirky says that with the Internet and Web, we're starting to re-use that capacity for social good, finding ways to create value from what was previously wasted. So how big is that surplus? So
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                          TripIt Is My New Best Friend!

                          If you travel and haven't yet heard of TripIt, you're going to be sooo excited! TripIt is a site that keeps track of your travel. But unlike many other sites that promise to help you with your travel, this one is so easy and useful, you'll actually use it. Here's what you do: when you get an itinerary from the airline or a hotel, just email it to plans@tripit.com. You're done. When you email your first item to TripIt, they'll create an account for you and send you a confirmation email. Click the link and you're in. I was
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                          Google Web Toolkit

                          I just posted my interview with Bruce Johnson on the Google Web Toolkit. This was a fun interview and I learned a lot. GWT allows you to write AJAX applications in Java that then gets compiled to Javascript.
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                          World Wide Network

                          Dave suggests that we not use "graph" when we mean "network." To that end, I think we should further dismiss the confusion of the word "web" and avoid that in usage as well since it's less descriptive than "network" and not even technically correct. From now, on, no more "World Wide Web." We'll talk about the World Wide Network. Hmm, maybe not...
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                          NBC's Troubles

                          NBC has announced that it will open its own download site for it's programs after a dispute with Apple over the price and DRM for its programs on ITMS. There are a lot of people who think NBC is mad to take their shows off of ITMS and maybe they are, but I think NBC and others are bound to explore their options in this brave new world. We call NBC, CBS, ABC, and others "networks" because in the old days they had to worry about distribution because of the limits of technology (VHF television has a 50 mile
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                          User Expectations Are Out of Control

                          This is great essay from Raganwald on what users expect and IT fails to deliver. Hyperbole? Sure, but that makes it funny and just like antiseptic, the sting let's you know it's working.
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                          Facebook for the iPhone

                          Facebook announced a version for the iPhone. The formatting and content of the site is rearranged to create a more pleasing iPhone experience. I just logged on from my iPhone and found it far superior to navigating the tradition Facebook site from the iPhone. Of course, there's not really an "iPhone version" since the iPhone version will work on anything with a browser. It's not as nice on a full sized browser as the traditional formatting, but it would probably be nicer on, say, Opera on your Razr (someone let me know, please). Earlier, Netvibes introduced an iPhone version
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                          When Recommendations Go Wrong

                          I just logged onto Netflix to add some shows to my kid's queue. The first recommendation was "The Princess Diaries (Fullscreen)." I'm always curious why Netflix (or Amazon, etc.) is recommending something. The reason left me shaking my head: "Because you enjoyed: The Princess Diaries (Widescreen)." Huh? I enjoyed seeing the whole movie so much--I'd love to see it with the sides cut off! Netflix apparently views the fullscrren and widescreen versions as two different titles instead of a single title with different options. Weird.
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                          A Metadata Interface for Spreadsheets

                          Mike Farmer asks why spreadsheets (including Apple's new Numbers) don't include ways of getting at data. Now that we have an easy way to assemble our data and make it look great we need a way to get at our favorite data. Imagine for a second, that on the left side of Numbers there is an option for getting your data from a Data Warehouse, Web Site, Web 2.0 interface (i.e. RSS, WebService, etc), or XML & CSV files. Now imagine that you click on one of those and you get a Metadata explorer that shows user friendly views
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                          Whoa! Facebook Returning Free PHP Code...

                          I just clicked on the photos application in Facebook and got back some PHP code. I won't publish it here, for obvious reasons, but this is the header: <?php /* -------------------------------------------------------- My Photos - html/photos.php --- Author: Jared S. Morgenstern Creation Date: 7/7/06 Overview: Dispatcher page for code encapsulation. -------------------------------------------------------- */
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                          Platform Strategies that Work

                          I've been following Gnomedex via Twitter--a bunch of people I follow are there. Dave Winer just said, regarding Mahalo: When someone gets up and gives a speech about a platform, my mind gets engaged about ways I can have fun or make money. There's none of that with Mahalo. It's about Jason and his investors making money. Why should I care about that? It's like the iPhone. Very limited opportunities for us to be creative. From Here's what bothers me about Mahalo (Scripting News)Referenced Fri Aug 10 2007 18:28:11 GMT-0600 (MDT) Dave is making an excellent point here--maybe the
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                          One Stop Business Registration

                          I just finished setting up an LLC using Utah's One Stop Business Registration. This is an event-style eGovernment service that we first envisioned when I was CIO. It's been in operation for a while, but this was my first opportunity to use it. I was impressed. The application takes all of the various interactions you'd have with the State to create a business and streamlines it into one, easy to follow workflow. The only criticism I had, and it's minor one, is that the application asked if I wanted to add any additional articles to the Articles of Incorporation,
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                          Perl Web Framework Recommendations

                          Does anyone have recommendations on a Perl Web framework? I've heard of Catalyst and not much else. A few things make me leery: the blog is infrequently updated and the last release of the code was November of 2006. I know there are other frameworks (I vaguely remember attending a talk at OSCON) but I don't know anything about them.
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                          My Media Consumption Diet

                          Ian Forrester tagged me on a meme to share my media consumption diet. So here's my diet: Web: I'm on the Web all the time. Even more now that I've got an iPhone. I typically have a dozen tabs open on my browser from various things I'm looking at on any given day. I used to have over 100 feeds on my news reader (NetNewsWire or Google Reader depending on my mood), but I've whittled that down to around 40 by getting rid of things I hardly ever read in detail. I used to use Firefox exclusively, but swung
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                          A World With No Advertising

                          Most of complain about ads, particularly ones that are "in our face" like the new floaters appearing on Web sites. Barnett has an interesting perspective based on a year spent in the Soviet Union in 1985: One thing I remembered from my summer in the USSR in 1985: no advertising meant no one knew where anything was or how to buy it, so you wasted so much time ferreting out such info--just wandering around. From The Gap will map itself (Thomas P.M. Barnett :: Weblog)Referenced Thu Jun 28 2007 16:12:22 GMT-0600 (MDT) Of course, that doesn't mean all ads
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                          Java Framework Round-Up

                          Matt Raible of Raible Designs gave this morning's keynote presentation comparing Java Web frameworks (slide - PDF). Matt started off with an overview of the pros and cons of each framework, as he saw them. Java Server Faces or JSF is the Java EE standard. Lots of demand and lots of jobs working with JSF. Initially, its fast and easy to develop with. There are a lot of tools and component libraries are plentiful. The bad news: Tag soup for JSPs--the pages are lots of anything but HTML. JSF doesn't do REST-style Web services well and security can be
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                          Safari as a Development Platform

                          I just put a piece up at BTL with my thoughts of Apple's announcement that Safari will be the SDK for the iPhone. Bottom line: it's a sign of the times and a move in the right direction. Feel free to "vote" that the article is "worthwhile." :-)
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                          Stupid Web Design Tricks

                          I found this list of 19 things not to do when building a Web site. The first, DO NOT resize the user's browser window, EVER resonated with me because I was reading a site last week that had some great information that I wanted to read, but every time I clicked on a link, my browser would blow up to full size. I finally gave up--it was just too annoying to go on. I also liked number eight: If your website does not work in Firefox, welcome to 2007 DUMBASS. Even though on average, only 10% or so of
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                          Schmedley

                          Paul Figgiani sent me a link to Schmedley. It's like the OS X dashboard inside the browser. The fact that you can do this kind of thing in a browser still amazes me. Update: I wrote more about Schmedley at BTL this afternoon.
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                          Marc Hadley on WADL: a RESTful API Description Language

                          Marc Hadley (from Sun Microsystems) is giving a talk called "Describing Web Applications - WADLing with Java." WADL is a RESTful description language for Web APIs. WADL comprises resource, method, request, and response descriptions. Marc gives an example using the Yahoo News Search API. Resources are specified relative to a base URI and can describe parameters that are common to all methods. Methods are the standard HTTP methods and can specify a request and response set for that method. Responses have representations that describe the type of the response. The language can also describe faults as responses. There are
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                          Prabhakar Raghavan on Science for Engaging and Monetizing Audience

                          Prabhakar Raghavan from Yahoo! Research(click to enlarge) Prabhakar Raghavan is giving the morning keynote. He's the head of Yahoo! Research. The title of the talk was "What sciences will Web N.0 take?" But, more accurately, I'd call it "Science for Engaging and Monetizing Audience." Yahoo! takes in editorial, free (including blogs, twitter, pictures, etc.) and commercial content "content." The audience "consumes the content" but also enriches the content. Finally the audience transacts (commerce) with the content. Yahoo! isn't the only one in this business. Google, AOL, MSN, and even NewsCorp are in the business of matching content to audience
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                          Web Science: Do We Need a New Discipline?

                          Web Science panel(click to enlarge) I'm in a panel at WWW2007 on Web Science, essentially a proposal for a new discipline. The field would be interdisciplinary, taking things from areas as diverse as sociology, physics, biology, law, and psychology, as well as the areas you might immediately think of like computer science or math. What is Web Science? Here's a quote from a Science paper on Web Science: When we discuss an agenda for a science of the Web, we use the term "science" in two ways. Physical and biological science analyzes the natural world, and tries to find
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                          Applied Web Heresies: ETech 2007

                          I really wanted to go to Putting the Fun in Functional: Applying Game Mechanics to Social Software by Amy Jo Kim, but my inner geek won out and I went to Applied Web Heresies with Avi Bryant (slides). I hope someone else took good notes. The basis for the talk is Seaside, a web framework for Smalltalk that Avi wrote several years ago. The problem with Seaside is you're not going to use it! There are a lot of interesting ideas in Seaside that people should know, so this tutorial is way of spreading the ideas outside of Smalltalk.
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                          Coder to Co-Founder: Etech Tutorial

                          I'm sitting in Marc Hedlund's tutorial, Coder to Co-Founder: Entrepreneuring for Geeks. Looking him up on the Web, I found, what else, a post he'd done about twitter about how Twitter is wall for the Web (and some other things). Something from Nothing: Marc makes the point that being employee number one for a company is easier than being the founder because being employee number one implies something's already there--a name, an idea, money, and so on. You should work on the idea that won't leave you alone. It's Good to Be King: It's fantastic to have an idea,
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                          Superbowl Exploits

                          Ryan Naraine reports that the Superbowl XLI site was hacked and seeded with exploits that will install a keylogger and backdoor that give the crooks access to the compromised machine. This is doubling interesting to me since Ross Jardine and I did the first two Superbowl sites on the Web for Superbowls XXIX and XXX. We even owned the domain name superbowl.com at one point. For Superbowl XXIX (1995) we ran a contest and gave away Superbowl merchandise each day with a grand prize of two Superbowl tickets. In 1994, that was a great way to build traffic and
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                          Bosworth on Physics, Psychology, and Software

                          Adam Bosworth almost always makes me think, so I jump at a chance to listen to him or read what he writes. He recently gave a talk in NYC as part of the Google Speaker Series and Darryl Taft wrote up a report at eWeek. Bosworth talked about how physics and psychology affect which applications fail and which succeed. His examples: AJAX, PDAs, and natural language recognition. His recommendations: Keep it simple and stupid--even if that requires more clicks Use AJAX where it makes a difference--not just the geewhiz factor Make your tools transparent and fast Support bottom-up learning
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                          Firefox, Internet or Search Engine? You Decide

                          Firefox T-Shirt(click to enlarge) Today I was in REI. I had on my Firefox T-Shirt. The guy helping me with flashlights said "Oh, I love that search engine!" Contrast that with this story: When I first bought the shirt my daughter, who was six at the time, climbed up on my lap and asked "Daddy, why do you have a picture of the Internet on your shirt?" Who was more right?
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                          Doing Time for Web Design

                          In the "be careful who you do business with" category is this story about New York authorities shutting down an illegal gambling operation. They also went after the Web site's designers and the security firm that did security screening for the site.
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                          Company Silos and Design

                          One of the criticisms of eGovernment is that it's silo'd--each agency is an island and there's little incentive and even less money for doing interagency eGovernment projects. But government isn't alone in that area--businesses are just as bad. In this talk on Good Design from User Experience Week, Peter Merholz talks about the silos that exist in companies that create barriers to serving customers. His specific example is how redesigning a bank's Web site isn't very effective when customers are so put out at the design of the paper statements they get each month that they've given up interacting
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                          Managing Your Online Reputation--With a Little Help

                          Wired has an article about reputation management services that are springing up on Web. Michael Fertik and his partners originally conceived of ReputationDefender as a way for parents to protect their children from potentially damaging postings to social networking sites like MySpace or Facebook. "I don't like the idea that kids and teenagers might suffer lifelong harm because of momentary mistakes," says Fertik. From Wired News: Delete Your Bad Web RepReferenced Wed Nov 08 2006 15:52:37 GMT-0800 (PST) Of course, the service might be useful to people who are a bit older as well. They charge a monthly fee
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                          Rails, Streamlined, and DabbleDB

                          I've been playing a little with Rails over the last week. This is the first time I really tried to build something I cared about in Rails as opposed to just running someone else's scripted tutorial. I'm having fun and I continue to be impressed with its power. I've reversed roles in this endeavor--one of my grad students, Devlin Daley, has become the teacher and is kindly answering my questions so I don't end up stuck in too many places. Today he showed me a couple of screencasts of data-drive application builders that left me slack-jawed. The first was
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                          GuruLib Not Hitting on All Cylinders

                          GuruLib Screenshot(click to enlarge) I don't often put things on my blog that people send me unsolicited, but occasionally it's relevant--or just catches my interest. Not long ago, I got a note about something called GuruLib, an online system for keeping track of your books. A while back I reviewed Delicious Library, an OS X app that I use to manage my library. As you can see from this public library from the creators, GuruLib uses the same "wood grain paneling" mode as Delicious Library, but don't hold that against it--that can be turned off in both. The feature set
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                          Kris Smith on Web Design for Podcasting

                          Kris Smith(click to enlarge) I'm spending the day at Podcast Academy. I just flew down to Ontario CA this morning and I fly back tonight. Nice, easy in and out. I missed the first talk, but gout here just in time to hear Kris Smith discuss successful Web design for podcasting. Integrating the Web site with the podcast is important for increasing traffic. Show notes, descriptions, and pictures flesh out the audio. Tracking, stats, and metrics are some of the basic tools that you need to measure success. What you do in this area depends on how you measure success.
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                          Elias Torres on SPARQL

                          I just published an interview I did with Elias Torres on SPARQL and the semantic Web at IT Conversations. This is part of my personal podcast that I call Technometria to couple it to this blog. Rohit Khare introduced to me to Elias while we were all touring the castle in Edinburgh while at WWW2006 in May. I started talking with him about SPARQL and immediately knew I wanted to know more about it and that he was the right guy to explain it. I think you'll find his interview interesting whether or not you're a fan of the
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                          Using Web Analytics Tools

                          Paul Allen says that this article on using Web analytics well is one of the best he's seen. I use analytics everyday on my own blog to see what keywords people are using to find things I've written, which stories are capturing people's attention, and where readers are coming from.
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                          Freelance Courier

                          I'm not sure what to make of this: a freelance courier match-up service. There are so many problems on so many levels. First, things on the site don't work (try clicking the FAQ), but more importantly, reading the list of suggestions (warning it's a MS Word document) made me queasy. Am I just too much of a geek to think carrying packages on airplane for other people, having to meet them, develop some bond of trust, exchange driver's license data, and so on is too creepy to even contemplate? Maybe a "people person" would think this sounds fun. Do
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                          Learning CSS

                          A friend of mine is learning CSS. Like me, his standard MO when learning something new is to just look at the source and start playing around until you get it right. Mostly that works for CSS, but I found that there were some subtle points that I didn't just pick up and having a book helped. Here were two I found very useful: The Zen of CSS Design : Visual Enlightenment for the Web (Voices That Matter) by Dave Shea and Molly E. Holzschlag, based on the CSS Zen Garden, was not necessarily useful for learning CSS (although
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                          Larry Weber and Customer Experience

                          I really enjoyed listening to Larry Weber speak about his view of how the Web will change in the face of "user-generated media," his catch all for blogs, wikis, podcasts, and everything else you can imagine. Larry is a well known high-tech PR person who's thought a lot about how new media influences the behavior of companies. It was especially interesting to me because of some other ideas and work I've been doing on enhancing customer experience in eCommerce and online service contexts. One of the key ideas I walked away from in the talk was that commercially oriented
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                          Social Playground or Media Sandbox?

                          Thomas Barnett, who I interviewed on my Technometria podcast a while back, has an interesting perspective on how technology influences geopolitics. In a recent post, he claims that online trends will ensure that ten years from now, the Web "will be more the New Core social playland than the Old Core media sandbox (not that Disney-ABC aren't trying)."
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                          Derek Powazek on Community

                          Derek Powazek is talking about new communities on the Web. He says that the Web is less about companies createing "company" towns and more about people creating their own spaces. He uses the Technorati Top 100 bloggers as examples of people who have enormous reach and create their own community. Company town are communities, but they're extrememly authoritative. If you step out of line, you can find yourself out of the community. When you create your own community, that's no longer true. Derek mentions MeasureMap as an example of a site that helps manage community--showing visitors and posts. I've
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                          Ray Ozzie's Clipboard for the Web (ETech 2006)

                          Ray Ozzie is the first keynote of the first day. He's talking about building composite applications (what he's calling mashups) on the Web. The real power is bringing composite apps to the user level. A reference to shell commands and pipes in UNIX bring a good image to mind for anyone who's done that. GUIs bring big apps that user weave together using the clipboard to accomplish work. The Web has a lot of standalone apps. Where is the clipboard for the Web? Ray launches into a demo of "live clipboard." This simulates a button control inside the browser
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                          My First Web Server

                          Jeremy Zawodny's reminiscing about his first Web server and got me thinking about my first server. In 1993, I left the University of Idaho's CS department to take a position at BYU. I was a formal methods researcher and at that time, the only way to run FM software was on big servers. So, I spent a summer at BYU waiting for my HP Workstations to show up. Kelly Hall had transfered to BYU from Idaho with me as a grad student. We were both bored. Kelly came in one day talking to me about HTTP and something called
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                          What Does This Data Tell You?

                          I ran across this article about the State of Mississippi's Web site. What caught my eye was the information that the site had jumped from 49th place in Brown University's study to 9th place. Now, I'm sure they all worked hard and that this is a great accomplishment, but the very fact that you can jump so far in a single year underscores the assertion that state Web portals really aren't offering very much. The truth is that we are still just playing around at level 2 of a four level eGovernment maturity model. The state eGovernment portals built
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                          Utah.gov a Model

                          Utah's State Web portal was mentioned as a model for other states in this Indianapolis Star story on plans for Indiana's Web portal: One model many are watching is Utah, which is recognized as an Internet pioneer among states and has configured its Web site by questions and services rather than by agency. It also offers breaking news, traffic reports and weather forecasts, information not typically found on a government site. From State has big plans for www.in.gov | IndyStar.comReferenced Mon Nov 28 2005 07:55:15 GMT-0700 (MST)
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                          Keep Science Off the Web

                          If you thought record companies and movie studios were the only organizations capable of harmful anachronism in order to perserve outdated business models, then you'll need to read this story from the Guardian about the Royal Society's stand on publishing academic reseach on the web: A spokesman for the Royal Society said: "We think it conceivable that the journals in some disciplines might suffer. Why would you pay to subscribe to a journal if the papers appear free of charge?" From Keep science off web, says Royal SocietyReferenced Sat Nov 26 2005 13:30:12 GMT-0700 (MST)
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                          Approaching Omniscience

                          I attended Paul Allen's keynote at eBusiness Day. He spoke on "Approaching Omniscience." Paul gave an amazing talk and I wrote it all up in a blog post but then a errant click killed the page where I was writing. Argh! Paul started with a quote from Robert Browning: "Grow old with me; The best is yet to be." This aptly reflects Paul's natural optimism. He ended by saying that we are empowered like no other generation to lift the poor and help people and giving suggestions about how people can change their lives and do that.
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                          Surfing Your Tivo

                          I'm probably just hopelessly behind, but in case you are too, I thought I'd post this. If your TiVo is networked (i.e. connected to your home LAN), but can surf the now playing list with a browser and download the shows. Just point your browser at https://your-tivo-ip-number/ The https is important. Otherwise, you end up looking at a do nothing splash page. You'll be asked to authenticate (HTTP authentication). Use tivo as the user name and your media access key (MAK) as the password. You can get the MAK from your Tivo under Setup. Once you download the program,
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