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                          Posts with keyword: privacy


                          Supporting LESS and Trustless Identity

                          Avoiding future identity catastrophes requires that we put technical and legal structures in place now to protect privacy and autonomy and provide censorship resistance.
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                          Recent Revisions to the Sovrin Governance Framework

                          The latest revision of the Sovrin Governance Framework is aimed squarely at showing how the Sovrin identity metasystem is compliant with GDPR and other privacy regulations. Compliance is an important part of adoption and creating "identity for all."
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                          Fixing the Five Problems of Internet Identity

                          Sovrin capitalizes on decades of cryptographic research and the now widespread availability of decentralized ledger technology to rethink identity solutions so that we can have scalable, flexible, private interactions with consent despite the issues that distance introduces.
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                          Equifax and Correlatable Identifiers

                          We can avoid security breachs that result in the loss of huge amounts of private data by creating systems that don't rely on correlatable identifiers. Sovrin is built to use non-correlatable identifiers by default while still providing all the necessary functionality we expect from an identity system.
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                          Life-Like Anonymity

                          Natural anonymity comes from our ability to recognize others without the aid of an external identity system. Online interactions can only mirror life-like anonymity when we have decentralized identity systems that don't put all unteractions under the purview of centralized administrative systems.
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                          Sovrin Use Cases: GPG as a Sovrin Client

                          GPG would make an excellent client for the Sovrin identity network and solve some of the problems that have prevented PGP from becoming a useful communication system.
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                          What Happens to the Data

                          Metromile offers per-mile car insurance based on an OBD II device that plugs into the car and reports data about how the vehicle is used to the insurance company. This raises questions about where the data goes, how it's used, and who owns it. Even more important, it's a business model that promotes the creation of data silos.
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                          On Names and Heterarchy

                          Heterarchical (non-hierarchical) naming systems are vital if we are to avoid the pitfalls and dangers of surrendering our rights and our privacy to a tyranny of connected computers and devices that intermediate our lives at every level based on centralized authority. This post explores names and alternatives to names, including the use of bitcoin as a distributed directory that is immune from the problems that hierarchical solutions impose.
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                          Intention Generation: Fuse and VRM

                          One of the most influential books I've read in the last several years is Doc Searls' Intention Economy. The concept is simple: customer demand is the source of commerce and yet business has done a poor job of finding ways to understand customer intention. Doc's ideas have given rise to a movement called vendor relationship management or VRM. The term is a play off of CRM, and leads to a key idea: customers need tools to manage their interactions with the people who sell them products and services. When I write about social products, I'm writing about one such
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                          Cars, Privacy, and Personal Clouds

                          We don't have to chose between functionality and privacy as more and more of our things get connected. Personal clouds provide an architecture that supports both at the same time.
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                          Standard Information Sharing Labels

                          The Standard Label Kickstarter project is raising money to design a label that will standardize how Web sites let you know why they want your data and what they'll do with it. I'm a backer and I hope you will be too!
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                          Help Build Legal Sidewiki

                          Not many people take the time to understand the terms and conditions of a service they want to use and if they do, they're likely confused and overwhelmed. I'm looking for someone to build a Kynetx browser app that would let legal experts add commentary to these documents to guide users and let them know what they're signing up for.
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                          Personal Data, Freedom, and Value Creation

                          Image by mkrigsman via Flickr Data is big business. Whether its demographics or FICO score, people know things about you and sell it to people who want know about you. If you're read my blog post on the Power of Pull (or listened to the podcast) then you know that I believe we haven't even scratched the surface of where data exchange is going. As more and more of our life goes online there will be more and more semantic, structured data available about every aspect of our lives. For example, your golf clubs will automatically register your strokes,
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                          Come to Digital Death Day

                          The day after IIW (that would be May 20th), Kaliya is running a workshop called Digital Death Day at the Computer History Museum. Death is a part of life but what does death of the physical self mean for the digital self? This is a conference focused on this question and others around "digital death". What does it mean for loved ones of the departed? What does it mean for professionals in end of life care and post mortem services? What does it mean for online tool and service providers? What does it mean for estate
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                          HB150 Gives Too Great a Power to State

                          Utah House Bill 150 is a bad bill that will give government too much power to invade your privacy without a warrant. The bill has passed the house and it now awaiting action in the Senate. Read this post, read the bill, and then take a minute to contact your senator and express your hope that they will vote against it. If you don't know who your senator is, you can find out here. HB150 would allow law enforcement agencies in Utah to use an "administrative subpoena" to ask for the records of people suspected of
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                          Space-Time-Travel Data Changing the World Now

                          Jeff Jonas, who is one of the world's premiere data analysis experts writes: Mobile devices in America are generating something like 600 billion geo-spatially tagged transactions per day. Every call, text message, email and data transfer handled by your mobile device creates a transaction with your space-time coordinate (to roughly 60 meters accuracy if there are three cell towers in range), whether you have GPS or not. Got a Blackberry? Every few minutes, it sends a heartbeat, creating a transaction whether you are using the phone or not. If the device is GPS-enabled and you're using a location-based service
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                          Contrasting Kynetx and Greasemonkey

                          Kynetx Network Service, or KNS, modifies a user's Web page using Javascript. The ability to customize pages in the browser is a powerful capability, but it goes well beyond that by allowing data from multiple sources, even other Web pages, to be used as part of that customization. Sure we can change change colors, fonts, and layout, but we can also mashup Web sites to produce completely new experiences. Described as I have, KNS is not unlike Greasemonkey, a popular plug-in for Firefox that allows user scripts to modify Web pages. In fact, in a recent post Paul Madsen
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                          P3P and Internet Explorer

                          If your Web service does anything that sets cookies, you'll probably bump up against the fact that Internet Explorer--since version 6--has implemented a fairly strict privacy policy regarding cookies. In a nutshell, if the site does not have the right P3P privacy policy, first-party cookies (i.e. from the site itself) are downgraded to session cookies and not stored in between browser sessions and third party cookies (i.e. from another site) are rejected completely. Here's what to do to solve this problem. P3P, or the Platform for Privacy Preferences is a W3C "protocol allowing websites to declare their intended use
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                          Dan Solove on Reputation

                          Clifford Thomson sent me a link to a talk Dan Solove gave at Google on his new book The Future of Reputation. I interviewed Dan on Technometria a while back about his earlier book The Digital Person. Dan's a very interesting speaker and raises important issues in his books and in this video. This is well worth watching if you're interested in the intersection of privacy and reputation in the Internet age.
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                          Facebook Beacon Demo

                          If you've been curious about privacy concerns over Facebook Beacon, this demo shows how it works and why some are concerned. I think Moveon.org is totally the wrong organization to take this on, but whatever. If you're a Firefox user (one more good reason to switch), these instructions show how to use the BlockSite plugin to kill Beacon. This will still allow you to use the rest of Facebook.
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                          Stop Complaining and Starting Building

                          Doc, as usual, hits the nail on the head in explaining how to solve the privacy-problem-de-juer: Facebook's advertising platform. To wit: If we want our reach to truly exceed Facebook's grasp, we can't just tell Facebook to stop grasping. We have do deals on our terms and not just theirs. We have to have real relationships and not just systems on the sell side built only to "manage" us, mostly by minimizing human contact. Perhaps most of all, we need to come up with systems that help demand find supply, rather than just ones that help supply find (or
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                          ProQuo - Stopping Junk Mail

                          I just created an account at Proquo and spent 15 minutes stopping the insane amount of junk mail I get. Most of the "do not mail" lists you get on with a simple click and some require filling out a form off the site. The most obnoxious was the DMA, which charges a dollar "to cut down on fraud"--yeah, sure. Like I trust them. The credit card link, unfortunately, didn't work--I'd love to get Capital One out of my life. I'll see if in a few months the volume has significantly reduced and let you know.
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                          EFF Wins 4th Amendment Email Victory

                          Richi Jennings has a nice wrap-up of reactions to the court ruling that EFF won against warrentless email snooping. Quoting Luke O'Brien: The ruling by the Sixth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Ohio upheld a lower court ruling that placed a temporary injunction on e-mail searches in a fraud investigation against Steven Warshak, who runs a supplements company best known for a male enhancement product called Enzyte. Warshak hawks Enzyte using "Smiling Bob" ads that have gained some notoriety. The case boiled down to a Fourth Amendment argument, in which Warshak contended that the government overstepped its constitutional
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                          2.9 Million Georgians at Risk for Identity Theft

                          ZDNet news reports that "A CD containing personal information on Georgia residents has gone missing, according to the Georgia Department of Community The CD was lost by Affiliated Computer Services, a Dallas company handling claims for the health care programs, the statement said. The disc holds information on 2.9 million Georgia residents, said Lisa Marie Shekell, a Department of Community Health representative." When I was Utah's CIO, identity theft on this kind of grand scale didn't make the news as much as it does now. If I were in that position today, I'd be very scared. It's not so
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                          Man In the Browser Attack

                          Russ Jones, a professor at Arkansas State University gave a presentation on phishing and mentioned a term I'd not heard before the "man-in-the-browser attack." The idea is to install a trojan on the browser that presents a small, borderless window in the browser that overlays the login fields of the target site in a way that can't be detected by the user. The user is at the real site (so the cert will check out), but the credentials are stolen when the user tries to login. Here's a paper that describes the attack and some potential countermeasures.
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                          Cloning a Verichip and Other RFID Fun

                          Dale Thompson from the University of Arkansas spoke about RFIDs (surprisingly, many of the talks are tutorial in nature, which I hadn't suspected would be the case). He mentioned Verichip, which is an RFID device the size of a grain of rice that is certified for implanting in humans. I had heard of Verichip, but was curious. Of course, the obvious question is how secure is such a device. The answer appears to be "not very." Jonathan Westhues has a detailed Web site describing how to clone the data on the chip. He also has an easy do-it-yourself version
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                          Digital Identity for Cattle

                          Marion Berry is the representative for the Arkansas First District in Congress, and the opening keynote at today's meeting. He seemed passably informed on identity issues, noting how important identity is in modern society. He's a supporter of the Real ID act, which makes me wonder whether he understands the implications of identity policy. He took questions at the end of his talk. One questioner asked him to respond to Arkansas farmers opposition to cattle tagging. I wasn't aware of the issue before. The program is part of some federal effort to track food supplies. I've written about this
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                          Cheap Pseudonyms, Privacy, and Sex Offenders

                          The BBC is reporting on a move by the British government to require convicted sex offenders to register their online identities. Of course, it only takes a minute of thought before you realize that its so easy to get a new email address that registering one doesn't do much good. There are some scary responses to that, like this one: If everyone had a single internet identity for life, like a National Insurance number, this would make it far easier to track people, he said. Child internet safety expert John Carr, of children's charity NCH, said: "This is a
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                          Does Your Four-Year Old Have a Full Time Job?

                          An article in this morning's Deseret News revealed that the Social Security Numbers of as many as 600 Utah children under the age of 12 are in use somewhere in the state by someone else. These workers might be using these SSNs mistakenly or they might not... The real story however, is that Utah law doesn't provide clear avenues and reasonable tools for the Dept. of Workforce Services to try to correct the mistakes. Workers are afraid of privacy law violations and have no authority to require employers to fix the problems. So, if your four year old gets
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                          Trusting Steve Gillmor

                          One of my favorite shows on IT Conversations was the Gillmor Gang. I say "was" because Steve's show hasn't been on IT Conversations for quite some time. That doesn't mean it's dead, however...The Gillmor Gang lives on at Podshow.com. I like the new Gillmor Gang. Its very unlike most things you hear--presentations or interviews. Listening to the Gillmor Gang is more like being a fly on the wall at a lunch with these guys. I know because I've been at lunch with many of these guys and this is just what it's like. The problem is that I always
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                          Undistinguished Identity and Reputation

                          I just posted an article on undistinguished identity and reputation at Between the Lines. People typically don't want their online activities correlated, but reputation is largely built from such correlations. Understanding and coming to terms with the tension between those two facts is going to be a large part of building reputation systems that work. The principles of reputation that Kevin Tew, Devlin Daley, and I discuss in our paper describing our reputation framework are aimed at lessening that tension.
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                          Free the Data!

                          Free the Data! Panel(click to enlarge) A specially arranged panel session called Freeing the Data was moderated by Kieron O'Hara (Univ. of Southhampton). On the panel were Daniel Weitzner (W3C & MIT), Daniel Harris (Kendra), and Jeremy Frey (Univ. of Southhampton). Jeremy Frey is a chemist and took the position that any scientist doing research should not only make results available, but the data as well. But making the data available isn't enough. We need to make it findable as well. Moreover, we need the context to be available and machine readable. Another issue with data is correctness. Published papers
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                          Your Cell Phone Is Watching You

                          One of my favorite programs from last week was Nathan Eagle's Where 2.0 presentation on using cell phones to predict user behavior. Using only publicly available data, Eagle was able to deduce relationships between pairs and groups of individuals. There are privacy concerns to be sure. Your cell provider already has much of this data. Every time two cell providers merge, what little protection we get from disparate carriers is broken down. What interested me most though it not the privacy concerns, but the potential to infer and enhance social interactions using the wearable computers each of us carries
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                          Grabbing Cell Data

                          Nathan Eagle's presentation at the Where 2.0 conference has some very interesting information about how easy it is to deduce interesting facts by monitoring cell phone location and proximity. Todd Biske has taken that and turned it into a call for better logging in SOA applications for the purpose of improving usability. This point to the need to carefully construct security policies around XML documents that are passed from place to place so that this kind of monitoring can occur without compromising sensitive data.
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                          SSNs and Security

                          A colleague of mine is taking his son to Washington D.C. with him on business and they decided they wanted to tour the White House. To get approval, he sent a note to his Senator's office. They asked him to send his and his son's Social Security Numbers via email so that they could do a security clearance. He objected and said he'd prefer to fax them the information. They responded that this was OK, but that they'd be sending the SSNs to the offices of other Senators and Representatives to coordinate their tour with other groups. Of course,
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                          Identity Privacy Contracts

                          I had a nice chat with Jeremie Miller this morning and he pointed me at a post I'd missed from Peter St. Andre on what he calls Identity Privacy Contracts. This is a well though out discussion on the levels of protection one would want in identity rights agreements. I think there will be a lot of discussion on this at IIW in May. Identity Commons is being reborn and hopefully this can be a mainstay in it's mission. To work, IRAs or IDPCs need organizational muscle, legal work, etc. Identity Commons, reconstituted, is probably the right place to
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                          Viruses, P2P, and Privacy

                          The Japan Time is reporting that the names of 10,000 Japanese convicts have been leaked from an employee's personal computer that was infected by a virus from the P2P program Winny. The information was initially stored on a CD by a staff member at Kagoshima Prison and handed to a staff member of Kyoto Prison in December. That employee left the CD in a personal computer. The data was leaked after the computer was infected with a virus via the peer-to-peer file-sharing program Winny, which had been installed on the computer, the officials said. From The Japan Times Online
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                          A Model Regime for Privacy Protection

                          Daniel Solove and Chris Hoofnagle have published a paper entitled A Model Regime of Privacy Protection. The paper outlines patches that could be applied to current US law to increase privacy protection. In the paper, Solove and Hoofnagle build the model regime around Fair Use Practices, a set of very general principles: There must be no personal data record-keeping system whose very existence is secret. There must be a way for an individual to find out what information about him is in a record and how it is used. There must be a way for an individual to prevent
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                          NSA Cookies Cause Holiday Stir

                          Seems that the NSA turned on persistent cookies in violation of a Federal rule that proscribes them unless there is a "compelling need." Of course there are a few people turning this into some kind of conspiracy or sign of gross incompetence. Of course, none of these people are concerned about the millions of other Web sites that use cookie. Bizzare. Jeff Jarvis also comments on this story and how the media thinks they got some huge scoop here. Here's a white paper (PDF) that I wrote when I was Utah CIO about cookies and privacy. We were having
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                          IIW2005: Identity Rights Agreements

                          This afternoon there was a good sized group that got together to discuss Identity Rights Agreements. One big problem is the legal status of such agreements. Mary Rundle was very helpful to the discussion here. One point was that an organization (like Identity Commons) could create a "trustmark" that Web sites that take identity data could display saying they agree to abidee by IRAs. This provides some prtection under trademark law, but may not be the best way really punish violaters. Data protection privacy commissioners want to create a regime for protecting personly identifying information. What we're saying in
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                          IIW2005: Dick Hardt on Identity 2.0

                          Dick starts with a discussion of the SXIP 1.0 architecture. One of the things I note as I listen to Dick is the nomenclature problem. We have some people calling users "users" and others calling them "principals", some calling the relying party the "membersite", identity providers can be "homesites," and so on. This is hard to keep straight. You need a score card to keep up. I'm not picking on Dick here--he's picked his words and they're as good as anyone else's. The Identity Gang wiki has an identity lexicon that is attempting to "create a minimal set of
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                          Tracking Your Printer

                          The EFF has been working to crack the code that some color printers put on every printed page. It's been long known that printer manufacturers put these codes in many color printers at the behest of the Secret Service, who's concerned about the potential for counterfeiting. The EFF, however, has revealed just how these codes work (with images). The images really bring this home. Just think about every document you print containing tracking codes that link it back to the printer in your office or home. The privacy concerns are huge. Imagine that you print a handbill complaining about
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