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                          Posts with keyword: etech2007


                          Hacking Organizations: Chad Dickerson

                          Chad Dickerson, who I've known since he was the CTO at InfoWorld, and runs the Yahoo! Developer Network, is giving a talk about how to hack an organization. When Chad put together the Yahoo! Hack day, he had to hack everything from the way brand managers thought about brand to talking the groundskeepers into letting people camp on the lawn and turning off the sprinkler system.
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                          The Core of Fun: Raph Koster

                          Raph Koster introduces himself as an alien from another planet: a game designer. He's the author of The Theory of Fun. He starts by introducing structure in music and art with some cool audience participation. There are different dimensions to fun: Hard Easy Visceral Social Hard fun is about solving problems. The problems tend to be mathematical Therefore the grammar of hard games ignore presentation. He applies the theory of fun to Amazon.com and concludes that it's not structural, not fun. There a lots of sequential steps and don't provide any "fun" or feedback. The magic ingredients: Territory -
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                          Is This an Apple Conference?

                          This is a big hotel. There are several other conferences going on at the same time as ETech. I was in the gift shop during the break. A guy with a badge from one of the other conferences saw me standing in line, MacBook in hand, and asked me "Is that an Apple conference or something? Everyone there is using an Apple!"
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                          Learning from Muggles

                          Danah Boyd is talking about learning from muggles. If we consider the technologists to be the wizards, that makes the normal user a muggle. There's a real danger in designing for ourselves. Danah describes four stages people go through in their lives: Identity formation and role-seeking - young people are trying to make sense of the societal roles around them. We are defined, in large part, by the people around us. Friendship and interaction become important. Integration and coupling - This period is trying to find meaningful labor and determine how they can contribute. A lot of twenty-somethings are
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                          The Coming Age of Magic: Ubiquitous Computing User Experiences

                          Mike Kuniavsky(click to enlarge) Mike Kuniavsky, the founder of Adaptive Path, has a company called Thing M, a device design studio that "Lives at the intersections of ubiquitous computing, ambient intelligence, industrial design and materials science." He's giving a talk on The Coming Age of Magic. The idea is that Moore's Law has pushed the price of computing so low that it is nearly disposable. Computing can be everywhere. People have talked about ubiquitous computing for a long time, but the era of cheap, low-power computing, and wireless communication has arrived. We no longer need to serve as the
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                          IT Conversations Meetup

                          I just got back from the IT Conversations meetup here at ETech. I really enjoyed meeting people, talking about what they like and don't like, and hearing how they use IT Conversations. There were about a dozen people there. Doug Kaye was able to come and I think people enjoyed quizzing him about the beginnings of IT Conversations and giving him feedback on some of the technical aspects of how things work. Thanks to everyone who came! If you weren't able to be in San Diego for this meetup, we plan on having more in other parts of the
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                          Advanced Analytics in the Anonymized Data Space: Jeff Jonas

                          Jeff Jonas gave a great keynote this morning. (Here's a paper from IEEE Security and Privacy that explains some of this.) This afternoon he's adding context. Literally. Contexts allow seemingly unrelated records to become related. The idea is that two records get created in two different data stores, because of some common event, but the common event is unobservable to the organization and the perceptions around that event are not connected. When the organization queries these data sources to make a decision, the fact that these records are related might not be known. He calls this enterprise amnesia. The
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                          ETech 2007 Photos

                          I've posted some pictures from the Emerging Technology (ETech) conference on my gallery site.
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                          Hierarchical Temporal Memories

                          Jeff Hawkins of Numenta (and also founder of Palm and Handspring) talked about brains and computers. He discussed hierarchical temporal memory in detail. There's a platform you can download and play with. I was busy listening and didn't get good notes.
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                          Creating Alternate Realities: Jane McGonigal

                          Jane McGonigal(click to enlarge) Jane McGonigal is a "happiness hacker." Or at least that's how I'd summarize what she said. She does this by designing alternate reality games. Alternate realities do away with limitation in an effort to explore possible alternatives to current situations. (Slide to be here by Friday.) Jane gives a "forecast from the future" of things she thinks will be important for technology and tech companies. Here are the things she mentions Quality of life is the primary metric for evaluating everyday technology Positive psychology is a principle influence for design The public expects tech companies
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                          AWS and Your Data Center: ETech 2007

                          Werner Vogels, Amazon's CTO, is talking about their Web services--specifically the outsourced data center products (S3, EC2, and SQS) that I've written about before and that were the subject of an IT Conversations interview I did with Doug Kaye and Jeff Barr. Werner begins by making a case that (a) scaling is critical to Web businesses and (b) scaling, economically, is really hard. I was just twittering with Phil Burns last night about servers. He just took delivery of four for TagJungle. He's got a lot of work ahead of him setting them up. When TagJungle grows again, Phil
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                          Secrets of Mental Math: Arthur Benjamin

                          The closing keynote for Monday night, usually something fun and light, did not disappoint. The speaker was Arthur Benjamin, author of the book Secrets of Mental Math. He's a "mathemagician" doing mental math at lightening speed. He did magic squares, 4 digit number multiplication, day of the week calculations, and other things. It was very fun and entertaining.
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                          IT Conversations Meetup Tuesday

                          Don't forget that we're having an IT Conversations Meetup tomorrow night at 7:30pm. The session in the Gregory A room of the Manchester Grand Hyatt. Doug Kaye's in town and will be joining us. Come and give us feedback, ask questions, and talk about anything at all. I hope you can make it.
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                          O'Reilly Radar: ETech 2007

                          Technology, hackers, Gibson, alpha-something-or-other, future, etc., etc., etc. You've heard the O'Reilly schtick before. Tim knows you've heard it before, so he skipped it and give as a new quote from Dale Doherty: "You guys aren't pulling your weight around here. You're not having enough fun!" Make Magazine is fun. People are doing what they do for the sheer joy of it. Snowboarding wasn't started as a business, rather for fun. Linus Torvald didn't start Linux for a business--he started it for fun. Finally, the Gibson quote. Tim talks about his future son-in-law putting a design for a new
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                          Applied Web Heresies: ETech 2007

                          I really wanted to go to Putting the Fun in Functional: Applying Game Mechanics to Social Software by Amy Jo Kim, but my inner geek won out and I went to Applied Web Heresies with Avi Bryant (slides). I hope someone else took good notes. The basis for the talk is Seaside, a web framework for Smalltalk that Avi wrote several years ago. The problem with Seaside is you're not going to use it! There are a lot of interesting ideas in Seaside that people should know, so this tutorial is way of spreading the ideas outside of Smalltalk.
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